Southern Pacific Lines

Coast Line Division 

“The Route of the Octopus”

 
 


SP Depots

Southern Pacific Depot Types

Common Standard Depots

  1. All of the numbered standard depot designs on the SP - numbers 1 through 26 - were adopted well before the Harriman era (numerous 22s and 23s were built during the Harriman years, though).

  2. John Sweetser



Standard Design Depots (no numbers)

  1. Depots that preceded the numbered series were of  a standard design. Hollister was an example of this standard design. Other depots similar to Hollister, around 54 in all on the CP and SP, were characterized by 32-foot widths and board-and-batten construction and were erected from 1865 to 1878.


  2. The first Hollister depot was built in 1871. It burned down on Jan. 5, 1876 and was replaced by a depot of similar design (i.e., the present building).

  3. John Sweetser



"Harriman Standard Depot"

  1. Except for Sparks, there was no such thing as a "Harriman Standard Depot" on the Southern Pacific (Sparks did follow a Union Pacific design).

  2. John Sweetser



Wooden Combination Stations

  1. The word Combination means the station had both a passenger waiting room and a freight room. They also had an office and a baggage room with two doors, one trackside the other opposite it so baggage could be wheeled through o the street side for easy transfer of baggage and express. Most had a train order board.


  1. Two story Combination Depot No. 22?s on the Coast Line were located at:

  2.     Gaviota, Goleta, Guadeloupe  (with /1948 addition), Chatsworth, Conception,

  3.     Oceano, Lompoc, Surf, 

  4.     Santa Susana, Sudden.

        Santa Margarita

        San Miguel


  1. Santa Margarita was NOT a "standard" depot design and did not have a CS number. Mr. Bender classifies the depot as a variant of the "Chico design," among the Queen Anne-style SP depots.

    Tony Thompson

Reference

  1. There are two photos of the Santa Margarita depot on the Santa Margarita Historical Society web page:

                                                                          http://www.santamargaritahistoricalsociety.org/pages/railroad.html

                                                                          Southern Pacific Depots in California Vol. 1, pg. 79 (S. Miguel)

                                                                          Southern Pacific Depots in California Vol. 1, pg. 84 (S. Margarita)

                                                                          Southern Pacific Coast Line Pictorial, pg. 74             (S. Margarita)

    The "Coast Line Pictorial" has a 3/4 view by Fred Matthews.


    The new Bender depot book has a 3/4 view by Will Whittaker and a north end view from the SP.



SP Station Numbers

  1. There was a correlation between station location, station number and station mileage. It varied over time. The SP did use a route symbol and the mile post to determine the station number until sometime before 1953.


  1. SP's numbered standard depots were originally developed before the Harriman era.



SP Station Boards Signs

  1. Depots have "station boards", the white boards that display the stations name, (i.e., Surf, Oceano, Eureka, etc.). SP did call their sign font "Egyptian," The signs were variable length to accommodate different length names.

  2. Tony Thompson


  1. A quick check of photos in the SPH&TS volumes on Pacific Lines stations shows most station signs with only the station name by the 1950's time of those photos.

  2. Bill Decker

Reference

  1. The kind of station sign at places where there was no depot is in the Bruce Petty books drawing CS 1318, page 7 in Petty Volume 2, and specifies Egyptian lettering. The corresponding drawing for signs on depots is CS 1319, and it also specifies Egyptian.

  2. Tony Thompson

Drawings

  1. The actual drawing for station signs is C.S. 1318. A copy is posted in the Espee Yahoo Group under station sign or signs.

  2. Ernie Fisch

Modeling Station Board Signs

Lettering & Modeling

Decals

Microscale  #87-1376

  1. Actual sign LETTERING, can be found in Microscale set 87-1376 (HO scale) -- SP station signs, milepost numbers,

  2. P-plates, etc.


  1. Microscale should have taken just a bit more time with the set. Leaping off the decal sheet are two place names: "Allbany" and "Sacremento."

  2. Bill Decker

Microscale  #87-1401

  1. #87-1401 has station signs, DTC block signs, absolutes, G/P-plates, etc.

  2. Tim O'Connor

Microscale  #87-1332

  1. Microscale set 87-1332               http://www.microscale.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=87-1332

  2. Pat Flynn


Dry Transfers

  1. Signs made with dry transfers have variable success.

Railfonts

  1. You can used the Railfonts type for a depot sign. I've checked it against the SP lettering drawings at CSRM.

  2. Tony Thompson                                                www.RailFonts.com

                                                                              http://tinyurl.com/cpxna2v

Reference

  1. See the article on an SP depot in Model Railroad Hobbyist in November 2012.

  2. View at:                                                             http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/magazine/mrh-2012-11-nov

  3. Tony Thompson



Common Standard Plans/Drawings

  1. Regarding the CS diagram book, there was no "book" singular, but many books, adopted to particular division needs or even subdivision needs, as well as to the needs of particular engineering specialties. Certainly the various ones at Shasta Division Archives differ considerably in content and size from each other. I don't think SPH&TS has many.

  2. Tony Thompson


  3. The applicable drawings were determined one area at a time. Although roadbed and track may change over the years, there are certain things which cannot be changed, ever. From what a bridge engineer explained, each district had what applied to their region, and their region only. And thus should a consulting firm had taken on some relocation in Oregon, our (C.S.) standards would not have been applicable, and again you would have to obtain another set of drawings.


  4. One C.S. may have a title of Typical Roadbed Grading, but that applied to another location, not our area. The office of the Division Engineer sent a box of applicable standard drawings for the S.W. region.


  5. Since there were no books, they would have to figure out what drawings were needed and then pull the individual drawings. There was at least one rank of drawers, maybe more. The rank was at least six feet high and maybe 12 feet (or more) wide. The drawings were all B size and the drawers were about 1" high. Normally there were several copies of the drawing in the drawer. When they ran out they requested more from San Francisco. It would take time to collect all the drawings.


  6. They had reproducible copies of the erecting diagrams and other loco parts plus all the originals generated in Sacramento.


  1. Among SP’s Common Standard depot designs, the most common difference among examples of a particular design is the length of the freight room. These were sized according to expected traffic, and in later years, as those predictions proved optimistic or pessimistic, many depots had freight rooms shortened or lengthened.


Jean-Guy Dube Depot Architectural Drawings

  1. Jean-Guy is an architect and has been researching lots of SP Depots and drawing them - architectural drawings (Type 18 & 22). These are reminiscent of SP Standard drawings and are very good with extra information on the drawing. Presently he has drawn: Goleta, etc.                                                            jgdube@hotmail.com


  2. Some of Jean-Guy's drawings are offered by the South Coast Railroad museum through their online store.

  3. Here is a direct link to the drawings                      https://store.goletadepot.org/SearchResults.asp?Cat=1827


  4. Also some of his drawings will be in Henry Bender's much awaited Signature Press Depot book.

  5. Bruce Morden


Modeling a Scratchbuilt Espee Station

Roof

  1. For the shingled roof, both Pikestuff (Rix Products) and Northeastern offer sheets of shingle roofing.

                                                                                www.northeasternscalelumber.com/ products.html


  1. Minute Man Scale Models carry such things as peel and stick N-scale shingles in a variety of patterns, including the Fish Scale pattern that was sometimes used on Type 22 and older wooden depots.

  2. Diane Wolfgram                                                    www.MinuteManScaleModels.com


Siding

  1. Evergreen offers a “novelty siding” much like the SP “rustic” siding, with a 0.083-inch board width. That translates to about 7.25 inches in HO scale, close enough to the prototype’s 8-inch siding. The Evergreen part number is 4083.


  1. The size of trim boards for the corners of the building is an interesting challenge, because SP depots did not always use the same size boards for this application. A common size was 1 x 8-inch boards, both for corner trim and for window and door surrounds. But careful examination of photos, and scaling of sizes, also shows use of 1 x 6-inch and 1 x 4-inch boards in other cases.

  2. Tony Thompson


Windows

  1. There are Grandt Line (grandtline.com) architectural features, both windows and doors, which capture the main look of the SP depot features, even if none of them are an exact match. Here is the list of Grandt parts which work:


  2. Small freight room windows: “horizontal sliding window,” (part 5081)

  3. Waiting room doors: “factory front door,” (part 5139)

  4. Waiting room & bay windows: “6/4 double-hung window,” (part 5233)

  5. Side windows on bay: “8-pane window,” (part 5255)

  6. Tony Thompson


Flooring

  1. Type 22 station flooring was most likely flooring for a utility space in the West is a good straight grained douglas fir (known as Oregon Pine in the 19th century)  It may have been seen varnished, it was most likely painted.


  2. Some appear to be softwood, natural, with some finish. These are preserved or museum ones mostly, so may not reflect original condition, which could well have been painted.

  3. Tony Thompson


  4. See a copy of  Southern Pacific Company Combination depot No. 22 plans  revised August 19, 1911. There are seven sheets showing details and elevations.  On the first sheet it has a note in the Baggage room which  reads "Note: This floor to be 7" lower than office floor. 2" Pine or  Cedar flooring"  In the men's toilet there is a note which reads  "Cement floor & wainscot 5'-0" high in toilet" There are no notes in  the office or the waiting room. On another sheet (Sect thro Baggage & Freight Room) it shows "2" x 12" T & G Pine Flooring" on the freight room floor.


  5. In the South Coast Railroad Museum, the depot floor in the waiting room is pine or fir - definitely a softwood. You can sort of see the unpainted floor under the potbellied stove in the photo at

                           http://www.goletadepot.org/WalkingTour.htm#5 


  1. The structural members are all redwood. The office floor is a brown linoleum and unsure what is underneath. You can see the floor in the bottom photo at:                        http://www.goletadepot.org/freightoffice.htm

Freight Docks

  1. Concerning the siding of wood docks (surrounding the vertical part of the dock) around the depots, if it was painted, was a  light brown. Photos show them to be that way. Many deck sides look to be unpainted wood, like the deck top.

  2. Tony Thompson


  3. While it is possible that the siding on wooden freight docks on some wooden SP depots could have been painted Light Brown, I haven't come across any color photos of such. The standard, most wide-spread colors for the siding on docks were either Colonial Yellow with Light Brown trim or a solid mineral red. On the Coast Division, some depots had the dock siding painted Colonial Yellow while other depots had the dock siding painted mineral red. On the other hand, all of the depots on the San Joaquin Division shown in the books appear to have their freight dock siding painted mineral red.

  4. John Sweetser


  5. I went through a great many photos in Henry Bender's standard depot book, mostly B&W to be sure, and the siding on MANY of them, yes I said MANY of them, is a color which matches the building trim, Light Brown. It is true that some are clearly unpainted and the siding looks the same as the deck. There are certainly some which look painted but do not match the building trim color, and could well be mineral red.

  6. Tony Thompson

Modeling Freight Docks

  1. The freight docks top surface, in photos, look like unpainted wood. I weather freight docks much like flat car decks.

  2. Tony Thompson


  3. Finishing your wood dock decks depends a lot on what you are going to use to build them.

  4. If using roughened styrene I have often painted them with a flat light yellow (Floquil), then follow that with plain clear rubbing alcohol thinned light brown, darker brown and black shoe dye. For some decks that were originally painted I start with the original color then use shoe dye. For an example on the decks of PMT trucks that were originally red I use a dark brown then a bit of black dye.


  5. For real wood I don't paint and use various shoe dyes or again the original color and shoe dyes. Shoe dye comes in many colors, from the grays to the darker colors. It usually can be found at a shoe repair shop.

  6. Jim Elliot

Reference

   Southern Pacific Standard-Design Depots, Henry Bender


  1. For color photos, Dill's "Southern Pacific's Scenic Coast Line" shows the following depots with mineral red siding on the freight docks: Los Gatos (p. 47), Edna (p. 94; look just below the pilot of the cab-ahead), Ojai (p. 111, a particularly good photo), Saticoy and Fillmore (both p. 112) and Santa Susanna (p. 116). Also, San Luis Obispo freight depot (forgot to get the page number).


  2. Color photos in Dill's "Southern Pacific' San Joaquin Valley Route" show the following depots with mineral red freight docks: Los Banos (p. 28), Clovis (p. 58), Dinuba (p. 59), Selma (p. 60, an excellent photo) and Ravenna (p. 114).

  3. John Sweetser


  1. There are a good references about No. 22 combination depot in Railroad Model Craftsman in October 1991 Page 75. In the article appear paint, track arrangement but no reference about the floor?s material.

  2.     SP Depot List, c/o RMC

  3.     P.O. Box 700

  4.     Newton, NJ 07860    SASE




S.P Standard Structure Paint

  1. There has long been debate (and modeling effort) about how to model SP standard structure colors (Colonial Yellow, Common Standard color 201; Light Brown, CS color 202; and Moss Green for shingles, CS color 208). Tru-Color Paint is now offering model paints for these colors. Paint matches sent to me by modelers Peter Hall and Gary Ray, checked out against my Bowles drift panels. have already made brush samples, which compared VERY well, but I want to verify the same for the airbrush I have written about all this in my blog, and for those interested, you can see the post at this link:    

  2. Tony Thompson                                        http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2013/02/modeling-sp-structure-colors-part-2.html


Colonial Yellow

  1. The Colonial Yellow scheme appears to have been introduced around 1905. Henry Bender in his recent book on Standard SP Depots gives the impression that a lot of depots were repainted before long after that, partly because it was a new and brighter image.

  2. Tony Thompson

STAR Brand Paint

  1. STR-07      RGS /Rio Grande Southern Depot Buff

  2. The closest match to the Colonial Yellow color is the Star Brand paint matching Color Drift Cards.

  3. Tony Thompson

Tru-Color

  1. TCP-153 Southern Pacific Colonial Yellow


Trim Brown

  1. The SP paint chip for this color is clearly labeled "Light Brown," Common Standard Color 202.

  2. Tony Thompson

Tru-Color

  1. TCP-163  Southern Pacific Trim Brown


Roof Green

  1. SP used wood shingles, rarely shakes, and painted them green. Asphalt shingles came a lot later than 1915. Henry Bender's book cites 1910 as the date by which green roofs had certainly become standard, though of course many depots continued with older roof colors, notably red or mineral red, for years thereafter.

  2. Tony Thompson


  3. There is some evidence that the use of moss green-colored shingles goes back to at least 1910 while the earliest known written document specifying moss green shingles is from 1913 (for the Lemoore depot).

  4. John Sweetser


  1. In case anyone else is wondering, a wood shingle is saw cut on all sides to a uniform size/thickness. A shake shingle is simply split from the log, so is irregular in all dimensions.

  2. Mark

STAR Brand Paint

  1. STR-13     Roof Green

Tru-Color

  1. TCP-154 Southern Pacific Moss Green - Depot Olive


Roof Red

  1. Before the adoption of moss green, wooden SP depots probably had roofs painted mineral red, usually just referred to as "red" in news reports of the time. For example, a 1912 news report about building the depot at McFarland stated it will be painted the standard SP colors, with "Colonial Yellow" walls and a "red roof." News accounts indicate that the SP was still repainting some depot roofs the old color of red as late as 1916, such as at Mojave (the SP probably had a lot of old roof paint to use up).

  2. John Sweetser





Common Standard Depots Numbers  & Locations

Common Standard No.1

First Banning, Ca. Depot

  1. The first depot at Banning was either a two-story Combination Depot No. 1 or a two-story Combination Depot No. 2. Photos of the first depot may not exist. An article I found in the August 29, 1878 Evening Express of Los Angeles reported the opening of the first Banning depot: "We learn the stations of Cabazon and Dos Palmos...have been discontinued and a station opened at Banning." It's not known what happened to the first depot but most likely it burned.

  2. Henry Bender


Common Standard No.2


Common Standard No.3

  1. Martinez, CA                Fowler, CA

  2. Lovelock, NV                Paso Robles, CA

Reference

  1.                                                                       http://sptco.tnorr.com/Depots-Common-Standards/SP_CS-Depots.htm


Common Standard No.4


Common Standard No.5


Common Standard No.7

Depot CS Style No. 7, 14, 15

  1. The smaller depots, one story with or without a freight room. CS 7, 14, and 15 were smaller, about 20 feet wide (plus or minus), and were built a number of places.

References

  1. (*see Henry Bender's superb articles in Trainline issues 57)

  2.                                                                       http://sptco.tnorr.com/Depots-Common-Standards/SP_CS-Depots.htm


Common Standard No.12

  1. Orland, CA

  2. Benson, AZ

  3. Sunol, CA

  4. Casa Grande, AZ

Reference

  1.                                                                       http://sptco.tnorr.com/Depots-Common-Standards/SP_CS-Depots.htm


Common Standard No.11

  1. Brownsville, OR

  2. Canby, OR

  3. Capay, CA

  4. Fillmore, CA

  5. Live Oak, CA

  6. Tangent, OR

Reference

  1.                                                                       http://sptco.tnorr.com/Depots-Common-Standards/SP_CS-Depots.htm


Common Standard No.13.19

  1. Montague, CA  ?

  2. Pomona, CA

  3. Sanger, CA

Reference

  1.                                                                       http://sptco.tnorr.com/Depots-Common-Standards/SP_CS-Depots.htm


Common Standard No.15.21

Depot CS Style No. 7, 14, 15

  1. The smaller depots, one story with or without a freight room. CS 7, 14, and 15 were smaller, about 20 feet wide (plus or minus), and were built a number of places.


  2. North Hollywood, CA    (22' wide)               It was served by SP and by Pacific Electric.

  3. Valley Spring, CA           (20' 6" wide)

  4. Yuba City, CA                (22' wide)

  5. Bannng, CA ?                  (21' wide)

References

  1. (*see Henry Bender's superb articles in Trainline issues 57)

  2.                                                                       http://sptco.tnorr.com/Depots-Common-Standards/SP_CS-Depots.htm

Modeling Standard No. 15

Showcase Models

  1. Showcase Models at makes an HO scale laser kit model of the North Hollywood Depot.

  2.                                                                        http://lariverrailroads.com/lasf1/2010_sale_sheet.pdf 

  3. Tom VanWormer



Common Standard No.16

Depot Style No. 16

  1. The CS 16 design was built several places too, and was distinguished by being 25 feet wide. There were a number of colonnade-style depots which are interesting and attractive, and some very small ones which Bender showed in the second part of his series. All of these would be quite interesting to SP modelers.

  2. Tony Thompson


  3. Battle Mountain, NV

  4. King City, CA 

  5. San Miguel, CA   (Combination No. 16 Depot).

  6. Winnemucca, NV

References

  1. (*see Henry Bender's superb articles in Trainline issues 58)

  2.                                                                       http://sptco.tnorr.com/Depots-Common-Standards/SP_CS-Depots.htm

                                                                          Southern Pacific Depots in California Vol. 1, pg. 79 (S. Miguel)


Common Standard No.17

  1. Santa Paula, CA

  2. Saticoy, CA

  3. Saugus, CA

  4. Selma, CA

Reference

  1.                                                                        http://sptco.tnorr.com/Depots-Common-Standards/SP_CS-Depots.htm


Common Standard No.18

  1. Armona, CA

  2. Benicia, CA

  3. Danville, CA

  4. Esparto, CA

  5. Galt, CA

  6. Kingsburg, CA

  7. Livermore, CA

  8. Mountain View, CA

  9. Newman, CA

  10. St. Helena, CA

  11. Springfield, OR

  12. Walnut Creek, CA

  13. Whittier, CA

  14. Yountville, CA

Reference

                                                                          http://www.galthistory.org/history/railroad

  1.                                                                        http://sptco.tnorr.com/Depots-Common-Standards/SP_CS-Depots.htm


Galt Depot

  1. The Galt depot was a Southern Pacific Company design number 18, a standard blueprint modified for the use the station would receive in that geographic location. The structure was expanded in November, 1925. The north end of the bottom floor housed a waiting room, which ran the entire width of the building from east to west. In the middle was a coal, and later, oil burning stove surrounded on each wall by solid oak high-back bench seats. A door opened into the station agent's office and gave access to restrooms. Public entry doors were on the west and east sides.

Reference

  1.                                                                       RIBBONS OF STEEL

                                                                          Galt's Historic Connection with the Railroad, By Michael L. Greer

Modeling Standard No. 18

  1. At this time, no one has produced an HO kit of a CS #18 depot.

  2. David Coscia

Mountain View

  1. Mountain View made a modern replica.

  2. Seth Neumann


Common Standard No.19

  1. Montague, CA  ?

  2. Santa Rosa, CA

  3. Ventura, Ca.


Common Standard No. 21

  1. Bannng, CA

  2. The depot pictured on pg. 33 of  "Southern Pacific Lines, Pacific Lines Stations, Vol. 1" is Banning's second depot, an SP Combination Depot No. 15 or Combination Depot No. 21 (both types were quite similar in design). The depot was originally built at Eastberne (a station 1.4 miles east of Redlands) in October of 1893 and moved to Banning in August of 1904. (21' wide)


  1. The first depot at Banning was either a two-story Combination Depot No. 1 or a two-story Combination Depot No. 2. Photos of the first depot may not exist.

Reference

  1. The depot pictured on pg. 33 of the Southern Pacific Historical & Technical Society's "Southern Pacific Lines, Pacific Lines Stations, Vol. 1".


  1. A photo (or photos) of the second Banning depot can be obtained from Robert Morris Photography.

Modeling Standard No. 21

Showcase Miniatures

  1. Several years ago, Showcase Miniatures produced a limited run of kit #2010, Common Standard #21 depot. A second run is still available. You cannot purchase them from Showcase Miniatures. They are only available directly from me.

  2. David Coscia



Common Standard  No. 22

Type 22 station flooring

  1. The most likely flooring for a utility space in the West is a good straight grained douglas fir (known as Oregon Pine in the 19th century). It may have been seen varnished, it was most likely painted. Some appear to be softwood, natural, with some finish. These are preserved in museums mostly, so they may not reflect the original condition, which could well have been painted.

  2. Tony Thompson


  3. See a copy of  Southern Pacific Company Combination Depot No. 22 Plans Revised August 19, 1911. There are seven sheets showing details and elevations. On the first sheet it has a note in the Baggage room which reads "Note: This floor to be 7" lower than office floor. 2" Pine or Cedar flooring". In the men's toilet there is a note which reads "Cement floor & wainscot 5'-0" high in toilet" There are no notes in the office or the waiting room. On another sheet (Sect thro Baggage & Freight Room) it shows "2" x 12" T & G Pine Flooring" on the freight room floor.


  4. Burrell, CA                    Oceano, CA

  5. Cottonwood, CA           Oxnard, CA

  6. Dinuba, CA                   Paradise, CA

  7. Durham, CA                  Patagonia, AZ

  8. Earlimart, CA                Pleasanton, CA

  9. Fallon, NV                    Porterville, CA

  10. Fernley, NV                   Red Rock, AZ

  11. Folsom, CA                    Riverdale, CA

  12. Goleta, CA                     Santa Susana, CA

  13. Grenada, CA                  Seguro, CA

  14. Lone Pine, CA               Strathmore, CA

  15. Los Molinos, CA            Surf, CA

  16. Magalia, CA                   Waterford, CA

  17. Marathon, TX                Watsonville, CA

  18. Maxwell, CA


  1. A later variant of the Two Story Combination Depot No. 22 had hipped roofs over the two-story portion, the two-story bay, and the freight room. These depots also each had an open-sided roofed passenger shelter extending from the end of the waiting room. This design was built in the 1910-1916 years, and one in 1920. All except three were erected on the few lines built by SP affiliates during those years. No. 22 depots with hipped roofs were at:


  2. SP Standard No. 22 Depots with a Hipped Roof

  3. Chiloquin, OR        Maddock

  4. Colusa                     Oakridge, OR

  5. Fernley, NV            Robbins

  6. Litchfield                Sahuarita, AZ

  7. Lone Pine                Springville

  8. Lowell, OR             Tehama


  9. Verdi, NV

  10. Walnut Grove


References

        Std. #22 Combination Depot                     Mainline Modeler         Aug 1989

        Std. #22 Combination Depot                     Railroad Model Craftsman      Oct. 1991    Paint, track arrangement

                                                                           Southern Pacific Lines Standard-Design Depots


        Plans found in the Kalmbach book:            Railroad Station Planbook, 1977, ISBN # 0-89024-531-2.


  1.                                                                        http://sptco.tnorr.com/Depots-Common-Standards/SP_CS-Depots.htm

  2.                                                                        http://webpages.charter.net/altalair/sp_cs22_depots.html


  3. Anyone interested in learning more about SP’s standard depots, such as the CS 22 designs mentioned above, should consult Henry E. Bender’s pair of articles, “Southern Pacific Lines Standard Design Depots,” Parts 1 and 2, in the SP Historical & Technical Society magazine, Trainline, issues 57 (Fall 1998, pages 11–26) and 58 (Winter 1998, pages 27–33). The articles describe each standard design and include typical photos of each, as well as listing the towns where each design was built.

  4. Tony Thompson

Drawings

  1. CSRML also has full structural plans for the SP's Style 22 2-story combination depot.

Modeling SP Type 22 Depot

AMB LASERkit - SP Type 22 Depot, kit 134

AMB LASERkit - SP Type 22 Depot, kit 176, "Left Hand"


  1. The kit was released in 1996 as HO Kit #124, The SP Two Story, Type 22 Combination Depot. Many requested that they make a mirror-image it to a "left-hand" version. They did just that AND we're selling both versions at a 20 discount. The SP AMB depot kits lend themselves really well to alteration.


  2. Here's the link for more information:              http://www.rgspemkt.com/05Special.html

  3. John  Hitzeman

  4. Pres. AMB, Inc.

  5.                             http://www.rgspemkt.com

  6.                             http://www.laserkit.com


  1. First "prime" the wood with Minwax polyurethane (oil base) paint. It creates a very smooth finish. The idea being to totally eliminate the "wood grain" look.

  2. Tim O'Connor


  1. It's a complex kit in some ways, but is beautifully designed, goes together well, and no step is really difficultThey have a footprint of about 25 by 80 feet (without loading dock). A four-part series about it, including some prototype comments, can be found at these links below:

  2. Tony Thompson

  3.                                                                         http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2015/03/an-sp-depot-for-santa-rosalia.html

  4.                                                                         http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2015/03/sp-depot-santa-rosalia-part-2.html

  5.                                                                         http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2015/04/sp-depot-santa-rosalia-part-3.html

  6.                                                                         http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2015/05/sp-depot-santa-rosalia-part-4.html


AMB LASERkit - SP Type 22 Depot Kitbash Roof and Extension

  1. Replace the roofs with styrene sheet tiling, cut to size. It looks more realistic. I regret using styrene sheet to extend the roof (underneath the added styrene tile/shingle) - I attached it to the supplied wooden roofing sheets and it tended to warp slightly at the bottom edges. I'd use wood in the future, even balsa, which would retain its rigidity.

  2. Brian Moore


  3. You can use the wood supplied with the kit to make the extensions. There's just about enough to do it, and It could be replicated with styrene or other wood.


  4. AMB will sell you the sheets that have the doors and windows.

  5. Jim Pattison


  6. I agree with Brian about styrene sheet shingles. I like the Pikestuff material best, but there are several good versions. I did build my CS 22 depot with the kit stick-on shingles, and it sure is tedious, not to mention being difficult to get EVERY row straight and equally spaced. Styrene shingles would have saved me a great deal of time and yielded a better looking roof.

  7. Tony Thompson

California Model Company

  1. Kits 7001 (Orange), 7002 (gray), and 7003 (red) Combination Town Depot. The latter line showed up in two or three names. Suydam was one of the other names under which the kit appeared. The California Model kit was card stock (called mat board in the 1989 Walthers catalogue) and wood. It isn’t any where near the quality of the AMB kit though.


  2. The California Model Company kit, an Alpine Division Scale Model,

  3.                                                         http://www.alpinemodels.com/catalog/item/2762955/2639756.htm#image_1

  4. It's different of the AMB model. There are two adjacent-windows between office windows and the waiting room end wall.


  5. There is one other type 22 depot now available. It is custom laser cut copy of the Dunsmuir depot as it looked at about 1950. It is by far the most accurate type 22 available, but is a direct copy of Dunsmuir and not any other type 22. Laser cut, it is not yet commercially available. It will be expensive.

Placer, Nevada, & El Dorado R.R.

  1. Type 22 kits (in HO) were also made by the Placer, Nevada, & El Dorado R.R. (kit 621 S.P. Type Depot). The P, N,, & ED RR was all wood. It isn’t any where near the quality of the AMB kit though.



Common Standard No. 23

        Plans found in Kalmbach Publishing's book "Railroad Station Planbook", 1977, ISBN # 0-89024-531-2.

Paint

  1. The small rectangles of 1/64th plywood that are in the same "vertical plane" as the glazing are colonial yellow. The door "frames" are brown, the inside edges of the wall where the laser has cut the opening is brown, and the sticky backed 1/64th plywood "trim" that surrounds the whole thing is brown also. All is fine so far.


  2. Auburn, CA

  3. Caliente, CA

  4. Centerville, CA

  5. Felton, CA

  6. Fernbridge, CA

  7. Hillsboro, OR

  8. Lebanon, OR

  9. Loomis, CA

  10. Oakdale, CA

  11. Rutherford, CA

  12. Shingle Springs, CA

  13. Silverton, OR

  14. Tehachapi, CA

  15. Tillamook, OR

  16. Vina, CA

Reference

  1.                                                                        http://sptco.tnorr.com/Depots-Common-Standards/SP_CS-Depots.htm


  1. Anyone interested in learning more about SP’s standard depots, such as the CS 23 designs mentioned above, should consult Henry E. Bender’s pair of articles, “Southern Pacific Lines Standard Design Depots,” Parts 1 and 2, in the SP Historical & Technical Society magazine, Trainline, issues 57 (Fall 1998, pages 11–26) and 58 (Winter 1998, pages 27–33). The articles describe each standard design and include typical photos of each, as well as listing the towns where each design was built.

  2. Tony Thompson


  1. Centerville had a milk platform at least until 1940.

  2.                                                                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/47871268@N02/7322753330/

Modeling SP Type 23 Depot

American Model Builders, kit #150, With Dock

  1. American Model Builders, home of the Laser cut wood kits, offer the Southern Pacific CS no. 23 (one story) depots in HO and N scale, and O scale                                            http://www.laserkit.com/laserkit.htm

Paint

  1. STAR Brand Paint  STR-07      RGS /Rio Grande Southern Depot Buff

  2. The closest match to the Colonial Yellow color is the Star Brand paint matching Color Drift Cards.

  3. Tony Thompson


Common Standard No. 24-26



References

        Station - Lang, Ca.                                     Railroad Model Craftsman        Sep 1962

        Station - Gingerbread                                 Model Railroader         Jan 1964

        Station - San Fernando, Ca.                        Model Railroader         Dec 1958

        Station - Spreckels, Ca.                               Model Railroader         Nov. & Dec. 1966




Specific Depots

Arbuckle Depot

Modeling Arbuckle Depot

Side Track Laser

                                                                          www.sidetrackerlaser.com/Arbuckle.htm


Fenley Depot

  1. The new depot was completed in August 1914 at a cost of $5,000. SP closed it in September, 1985.  Fernley, NV with one-story-high bay and extended waiting room, 1914-1985, on the Reno-Ogden Route, moved in 9-86 to be Fernley Depot museum.

  2. Hemry Bemder

Reference

                                                                            Southern Pacific Lines Standard-Design Depots, pg. 149


Gaviota Depot

  1. It was located on the ocean side of the track at the east end of the trestle. Ten or so years ago you could walk over that area see where the depot had been. The station is a #22 standard design. Gaviota had the smaller version of the freight end, and the passenger end was truncated south of the bay window.


  2. There was about ten feet room on the oceanside of the Gaviota depot, then a sheer cliff. If there was room for wagons to stop alongside a dock, then any freight doors on that side would not have been "useless." If the door is at ground level, then it would be a baggage room door.

  3. John Sweetser


  4. As for freight doors on the oceanside of the Gaviota depot, if there was a freight dock on that side, it would almost certainly have had a freight door (or doors) on that side. Even without a freight dock on a particular side of a depot, it is still possible to have a freight door (or doors).


  5. The extent of a freight dock for the Gaviota depot could probably be determined from three plans in the collection of the Calif. State RR Museum Library. Two are stations plans, a 1904 station plan 5 1/2 feet long and another station plan four feet long. Since it would be expensive to get copies of the entire plans, the library still may be willing to make photocopies of just the portions of the plans that included the depot. Then there is a plan titled "February 24, 1919 Gaviota station buildings to be painted" that has a filing location of +D ID21264, which shows the location and outline of the buildings at Gaviota in a much simpler form than a station plan.


  1. There were two water tanks one wood and one metal. Also two larger section tool sheds. A photo shows a dwelling that looks to be for the section crews. The motor car sheds and M/W office was down near the end of the spur, SP company housing was near the mainline switch up by the trees.


  1. The 1956 timetable shows that the mail train, 90/91, had a scheduled stop there.

  2. Jim Pattison


  3. There were some stops to pick-up milk from local dairy ranches between SLO and L.A.

  4. Pat LaTorres


  5. Post office and market were on the highway across the road from where you turn to get to the place where the old depot was.

  6. Rusty Ron Plies MMR


   Gaviota Trestle is located North of the station (*see SPPT Vol. 1 pg. 152)

Reference

  1.                                                                         (*see Coast Line Pictoral pg. 221)


  2. Charles Lang gave Rusty Plies photos way back in 1981 and at the SPH&TS convention in SLO he showed a few of them. There is also a good photo of the station in the SPH&TS depot book and in the Coast book. Bob Morris (Photo Bob) has one you can buy from him if you wish to have a 8X10 glossy.


  1. I came up with the three views of the building but not the southside or oceanside view of the depot.

  2. Rusty Ron


  3. Never saw a picture of the ocean side.

  4. Charlie Burns

Drawings

  1. The Calif. State RR Museum Library has a 1904 station plan of Gaviota. In addition, the 1919 plan titled "Gaviota: station buildings to be painted" should show the location of structures.

  2. John Sweetser


Gilroy Depot

Reference

Drawings

  1. The Calif. State RR Musuem Library has seven sheets of drawings for the Gilroy passenger depot. The plan is MWD 1328. Also, the Shasta Div. archives is supposed to have a plan called "Addition to passenger station at Gilroy." The plan is MWD 1272. Contact Bruce Petty via his Los Angeles River Railroads website.

  2. John Sweetser


Glendale Depot

  1. This structure was the original Spanish-style depot.

  2. There’s an extended freight wing on the north (West) end, with a freight spur on either side of its platform.


Goleta Depot

  1. In the South Coast Railroad Museum, the depot floor in the waiting room is pine or fir - definitely a softwood. You can sort of see the unpainted floor under the potbellied stove in the photo at:

  2.                                    http://www.goletadepot.org/WalkingTour.htm#5 


  3.  The office floor is a brown linoleum and unsure what is underneath. You can see the floor in the bottom photo at

  4.                                    http://www.goletadepot.org/freightoffice.htm

Structural Members

  1. In the Goleta Depot, the structural members are all redwood.

Reference

Drawings

  1. Jean-Guy's Dube architectural drawings of Goleta are offered by the South Coast Railroad museum through their online store.

  2. Here is a direct link to the drawings                      https://store.goletadepot.org/SearchResults.asp?Cat=1827


Lompoc Depot

  1. Lompoc had an open air extension of the freight end probably for produce.

  2. Charlie Burns


Los Altos Depot

  1. Los Altos, CA is on the Vasona branch, between California Avenue and Los Gatos. The passenger depot is a "craftsman-style" design, completed in 1913. It appears to be custom-designed, and is quite unlike S.P. Common Standard designs. It appears that Paul Shoup, founder of Los Altos and then a rising star in S.P. management (eventually President of the S.P.), may have influenced the choice of depot design.

  2. Doug Debs

Refernece

  1. See photos of the depot in report dated Aug 27, 2012:

  2.                                           http://www.losaltosca.gov/uploads/6836/12-H-02,%20288%20First%20Street%20staff%20report.pdf

Drawings

  1. Mike Manson measured the Los Altos S.P. depot in the early 1970s. He made an excellent set of architectural plans of the "as built" condition. Recently he contributed a set of these plans to the Los Altos History Museum.


Mojave Depot

  1. The Calif. State RR Museum Library have a station plan for Mojave dated 1945 with revisions to 1948. The 1945 Mojave station plan is on just one sheet. The plan shows depot placement track work, fueling and sanding details and much more It is a great resource. It in fact shows the location and dimensions of every building in the Mojave yard.


  2. For a 1920s Southern Pacific Mojave station plan, contact the map room of of the Kern County Engineering & Survey Services Dept. in Bakersfield (this plan is on two sheets). Note: sometimes employees manning the map room counter are not fully aware of the railroad plans in the collection so be persistent.

  3. John Sweetser


Oceano Depot

  1. A 1952 Coast Division timetable indicates that there were no water facilities at Oceano so it is unlikely there was a tank there.

  2. John Sweetser

Reference

   A photo taken at Oceano can be found on pg. 96 of Dill's "Southern Pacific's Scenic Coast Line."

   There is a nice color shot of the Oceano depot in the front of Southern Pacific Passenger Trains, Vol 2.


Redding Depot

  1. The Redding depot is one of a number of "colonnade-style" depots built by SP.

  2. Tony Thompson

Reference

  1. Southern Pacific Standard-Design Depots, by Henry Bender. This depot style merits an entire chapter in Henry Bender's forthcoming book from Signature Press about SP standard depots.

                                                                        www.flickr.com/photos/84263554@N00/454817771/


Salinas Depot

  1. Salinas was a  quasi-modern. Windows, use of red brick, no round arches.

  2.                                                                     http://farm1.staticflickr.com/248/453174546_f2d287dbea_o.jpg

  3. Robert Simpson



Surf Depot

  1. The station is a mirror image standard #22 design with an extension on the north end, but it appears that some windows, and doors are in different locations than they would be on a #22 mirror image. Surf has fire hose doors along with diamond {Fireproof} shingles. The depot appears to have vertical boards under the eaves. It’s unknown if that is a standard item on #22s. The depot was at Milepost at 302.7 .

    Charles Burns


  1. The original station was built 1902 at a cost of $3,300. The waiting room was expanded during the war 25’ wide by 30’ long to the north to accommodate the increase in traffic. It was larger and  roomier than the earlier SP standard two-story depots. A prominent feature is the rectangular bay that extends up both stories capped by a  cross-gable roof. The main roof is also gabled, with its ridge parallel  to the track. Although the design has ?stick style? detailing, it has  less than earlier SP depots and it lacks the textured wall surfaces of  earlier Stick and Queen Anne style depots (although some No. 22  depots, especially in Southern California, had patterned shingles in the gables above the second floor windows. All the siding is horizontal. Some windows, and doors are in different locations than they would be on a #22 mirror image. Something about the Surf depot that is unusual. It appears to have vertical boards under the eaves. It?s unknown if that is a standard item on #22s.


  2. The telephone pole at the end of the depot (*see Signor’s, Coast Line, pg. 295) was removed and the pole line diverted around the rear of the depot with a cross arm affixed to the rear siding of the depot. The pole, which was true for all depots, at the waiting room end, was the “drop” into depot. That is, all the wires went down and into a patch frame in the depot, then back out and continued from the same pole. The addition of the waiting room made the span of wire too long and destroyed the “drop”. The “drop” was made from the 3 cross arms on the rear of the depot.


  3. As with other designs, Combination depots were built with a freight room long enough to accommodate the expected business. Surf station had a waiting room added on the west end during the war. It was for the waiting troops from Camp Cooke. It had restrooms and a ticket counter. The Surf station had revised plans to enlarge the living room and add a pantry, add fixtures in the bathroom, and change the location of the terra cotta patent flues.


  4. At the station was a wooden coach for the Roadmaster. There were 3  houses made of railroad ties for the Telegraphers, east of the station.


  5. There was a ticket clerk on duty during the day to handle the Army’s requirements. There was also a warehouseman to handle LCL freight. The second trick operator  was also the postmaster. Many things were ordered my mail order, Sears, Montgomery Wards plus money orders. By the end of the 50’s all this activity dried up. The prison was given to the state. The ticketmen and warehousemen were gone. Any agency activity was transferred to Lompoc and the only station employees were the train order operators.


  6. Groceries came to Surf twice a week from the commissary in SLO run by J.V. Moan Co. who ran the dining cars. Groceries and ice were ordered through the station agent  the day before. The food came down on the mail train and paid to the baggageman (TBM). Groceries were also purchased driving by car down the coast to Lompoc. The S.B.-Lompoc Local brought water.


  7. Bob Wolfe was personally responsible for closing down the agency at Surf. Warren Christiansen worked at Surf for 37 years and was the last one to turn the key in 1985. He started work as a call boy, responsible to call the train crews for work, later a relief yard clerk.


  1. The station and other buildings were razed when they were retired.


References

  1. An 8 x10 enlargement of the photo of the Surf depot that is on pg. 29 of the SPH&TS book "Southern Pacific Lines: Pacific Lines Stations, Vol. 1" can be obtained from Bob Morris Photography in Dunsmuir. He may have other views.


  2. Another possible source is Ken Meeker of Roundhouse Hobbies and Antiques, Box 4001, Stockton, CA 95204, 209-943-0913.  He sells depot photos made from original negatives but they appear to have been photographed in the late '30s or maybe the early '40s.


Modeling Surf  Depot (circa 1964)

  1. To build a model of Surf station for my 1964 Coastline layout, the station is a mirror image #22 with an addition on the north end, but it  appears that some windows, and doors are in different locations than they would be on a #22 mirror image.


  2. An 8 x10 enlargement of the photo of the Surf depot that is on pg. 29  of the SPH&TS book "Southern Pacific Lines: Pacific Lines Stations, Vol. 1" can be obtained from Bob Morris Photography in Dunsmuir.


Special Stations

Arbuckle Depot

Modeling Arbuckle Depot

Sidetrack Laser


Cascade Summit Depot

Modeling Cascade Summit Depot

AL & W Lines

  1. SP9 Cascade Summit Depot has been completely redesigned to be a kit in itself. No need to buy two kits to make this depot.

  2.                                                                                            alwlines.com


Dunsmuir Station

References

    Dunsmuir Ca.- Station Bldg                           Mainline Modeler                 Mar/Apr 1980

    Dunsmuir Ca.- Station Bldg                           Mainline Modeler                 Jul/Aug 1980

    Dunsmuir Ca.- Station Bldg./Loco Facilities   Mainline Modeler                Sep/Oct 1980


Los Angeles Union Station  (LAUPT)

  1. Unlike most large train stations where most of the functions were under one roof, LAUPT was built in a Mission/Spanish Revival + Art Deco style and consists of a number of buildings surrounding several outdoor courtyards.


  2. In a photo two large red tile roofed buildings make up an "L" shape. The 'vertical' part is the original main waiting room and ticketing counters. This large room has been roped off for many (25+) years but is used for special events and as a film location in MANY movies.


  3. The 'horizontal' part of the "L" is the current waiting room. The current ticket windows are under the area between the white vehicles to the right of the big red brick courtyard. Hard to tell in the photo, but they are parked on the roof of a building. The current baggage area is under the yellow car. A tunnel leads out to the center of the tracks, with ramps & stairs accessing each platform. The tracks are 15 to 20 feet above street level. Currently there are 13 tracks, I believe there were 15 at one time (??). The two nearest the station are for the Metro Rail Gold Line. The 10 tracks sharing 5 original platforms are for Metrolink and Amtrak. The furthest track to the right was used for express or to store cars.


  4. The passenger tunnel now also connects to the approx. 15-year old LACMTA building on the right.


  5. The two newer large white buildings south of the terminal are not part of the station and cover (more or less) the old PE freight terminal area.

  6. Rob Simpson


  7. There are a number of adjoining and intersecting structures that overall appear to be about 700 ft long with the main building in the center of it.


Daylight Track Length

  1. The SP Coast Daylight reached 18-20 cars during the years after the war. Based on a 1937 map, Tracks 9 and 11 at LAUPT could accommodate 17 inbound cars. Outbound, Track 9 could accommodate 19 cars and Track 11, 20 cars.


  2. The difference between the inbound and outbound numbers reflects keeping the engine escape tracks open on inbound trains. Photos indicate, though, trains sometimes pulled in to the full length of the track they were on, which would increase the capacity.

  3. John Sweetser


  4. If necessary (and if track space out along the river was available to stage a backing movement), SP could have done the same thing--obviating the need for an escape track.

  5. Joe Strapac

Paint

  1. The LAUPT exterior colors never changed since it was built. Off-white walls with a rust-brown trim, plus lots of colorful tiles. Color photos here:                                                        http://www.lariverrailroads.com/laupt.html


  2. Most Mission Revival stations were off-white, exceptions being Santa Barbara (a light brown-tan) and others.

  3. Rob Simpson

Reference

    LAUPT airphoto here:                                   http://tinyurl.com/airphoto-laupt

Drawings

  1. Drawings of LAUPT are available at:              http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/CA1312/ .

  2. Click on "60 b&w photos". If the link doesn't work directly (I didn't try it) use this path: Library of Congress > Prints & Photographs Reading Room > Prints & Photographs Online Catalog > Collection > Search Results > Record or this link:

  3.                                                                        http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/ .

  4. Type in Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal in the search area and your done.


  5. The drawings are in a TIFF format, so you can enlarge them and they stay sharp. Cool.

  6. John Totten


  1. Here's a collection of construction, dedication and historical photos of LAUPT at the LA Times website:

                                                                           http://framework.latimes.com/2014/05/01/union-station-at-75/#/0 

  1. The original signs say Union Station.

  2. Jim Lancaster

Modeling Los Angeles Union Station

Walthers

  1. LAUPT/LAUS are far larger than the model's 210 ft. length. They are modeling just the main ticket concourse, the main waiting room, the clock tower (provide your own clocks!), and the portico to the Fred Harvey restaurant. There are, of course, many detail bits to be added to this rather basic kit. Omitted from the kit are offices etc. to the left of the main ticket concourse, the Fred Harvey restaurant and associated buildings, plus everything trackward from the end of the main waiting room-- including the REA etc facilities. All of these could be scratchbuilt-- were one so inclined--a lot easier than the portions included in this kit. The platform kits also being offered look pretty good and make this tedious part of a LAUPT model much easier. Photos and a pdf of the instructions are right at the Walter's site.  http://www.walthers.com/exec/page/laup_terminal

  2.                                                                        http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/933-3390

  3. Jon C.

Paint

  1. In the model on display the color trim around the entrance and window arches is reversed from the prototype--dark where it should be light and vice versa. Even the prototype photo they displayed behind the model shows this!

   Ken Parks


LAUPT Butterfly Sheds

  1. LAUPT has butterfly sheds, built in the 1930’s.

Modeling LAUPT Butterfly Sheds

Walthers

  1. The Walthers kits (933-3188) are nothing like the LAUPT butterfly sheds. The Walthers sheds appear to model an eastern prototype from early in the twentieth century, whereas the LAUPT sheds, being built in the late 1930s, are more of a streamlined Art Deco appearance, and are best replicated by scratchbuilding them.

Scratchbuilding

  1. Use the old Suydam (most recently available from Alpine Division) posts for the supports and strip brass, strip styrene, and scribed styrene for the sheds themselves--not all that hard, if built in place, but still a tedious process.

  2. Tom Cockle


Old San Luis Obispo Station

  1. The old depot stood just south of the current building. The depot lasted 80 years. It was used as office space for railroad personnel until 1969. It was destroyed on August 13, 1971.

  2. Here's a shot of the building before its demise: http://tinyurl.com/mck74q

  3. Will Martin

                                                  http://sloblogs.thetribunenews.com/slovault/2009/09/01/southern-pacific-railroad-depot-destroyed/


New San Luis Obispo Station

  1. The depot at SLO was 237’ above sea level and located at milepost 252.1.

  2. The Spanish Colonial style was selected in 1941. With the advent of World War II, construction was held up until Jan. 11, 1943.

  3. It cost $96,000. It was dedicated Sunday, September 5, 1943 to the “people of San Luis Obispo and the armed forces” by

  4. Mayor Fred C. Kimball. Improvements were done in 1987 at a cost of $1.1 million dollars. The Baggage room was converted in the late 50’s for crew.  


  5. yellow lights outside Amtrak and SP offices illuminate tracks

  6. speakers outside announce arrival of Amtrak trains.

  7. Amtrak brief stops take on water from hose marked “Potable” for dining car.

  8. moon rises above palm trees and water tower

  9. North of SLO depot is a radio tower with 2 red lights on top, 1 white light below

  10. 13.1 miles from SLO depot to Cuesta

  11. SLO Station had and still has 2 tall station light standards.


  12.                                                                        (*see 1949 photo, CLP-124, drawing CLP-136)

SLO Depot Decorative Tile

  1. SLO depot, circa mid-fifties. Those little square things near the top of the two story part are decorative tiles. From the ground they appear to be 12" square. Each of the tiles is divided into quadrants, and there are two different motifs colors, rust and blue.

  2. Tony Thompson

SLO Depot Drawings

  1. Blueprints are in the SLO County Historical Museum.


  2. Frank Hodina's plans are in Coast Line Pictorial, page 136. Much of it is shown on page 137; north end on page 124. The structure is not much changed today from the 1950s.

  3. Tony Thompson

Paint

  1. Painting the SLO depot trim, particularly the band around the bottom is a brown. The Coast Line Pictorial has a good color shot of the depot in the 50's, the caption says it is cream and brown.


  2. The SLO depot was not painted with any of the colors shown there. The brown at SLO is not the "light brown" which is paired with Colonial Yellow on wood depots.

  3. Tony Thompson

Modeling San Luis Obispo Depot

Model Tech Studios

  1. Dave Haehn of M-TEC does specialty trees plus custom laser cut buildings. He is the craftsman that built the SLO and Santa Barbara depots that were sold at the SPH&TS meeting last year.

  2. Contact Dave at:                                             mtecmodels@frontier.com

  3. Jim Elliot


Santa Barbara Depot

Track

Pre-1969

  1. At one time the Santa Barbara Depot had three tracks. That track was used to set out or pick up mail cars in mid 60's (90-91, Coast Mail). They say "back when", that the PV car spots were filled year around by the folks that had estates in Hope Ranch or Monteceto (spell?). Around Christmas in early 1960s there were baggage cars spotted by the Fig Tree. These were for use by the REA. The switch (turnout) was removed on the State Street end before 1962.

  2. Lou Mandeville

1969

  1. The switches were out by 1969 but the PV tracks up by that huge "Morton Bay Fig Tree" was still used by the SP PVs or instruction cars. They finally pulled that switch in 70. That’s why those SP Official cars were spotted way down off the yard lead near Milpis St.


  2. The third track was actually taken out of service ie, disconnected from the main by the time SP became part of UP. The third track was no longer connected but was still in the concrete in front of the depot.

2000

  1. During the 2000 rebuild, the tracks were removed and a faux track was placed in the new concrete but flush to remove the tripping hazard.

  2. Bruce Morden


Paint

  1. It has been painted different colors in its first 20-25 years of life.

  2. Kevin Bunker


  1. Based on photos, the depot received the two-tone scheme sometime between 1942 or 1943 and 1946.

  2. The middle photo on pg. 131 of Signor's "Southern Pacific's Coast Line" shows the depot in a solid color. This photo was taken after 1942 or 1943. Photos on pgs. 28-29 of "Southern Pacific, Official Color Photography, Vol. 1" shows the Santa Barbara depot in the two-tone scheme. This photo couldn't have been taken later than around mid-1946. The depot was painted a light tan. It wasn't white (the top photo on pg. 107 of Dill's "Southern Pacific's Scenic Coast Line" shows a truly white building in the background at the left margin, obviously different that the depot's color).

  3. John Sweetser

Reference

                                                                          S.P. in Color, by Sweetland, page 65

Modeling SP Santa Barbara Depot

Model Tech Studios

  1. Dave Haehn of M-TEC does specialty trees plus custom laser cut buildings. He is the craftsman that built the SLO and Santa Barbara depots that were sold at the SPH&TS meeting last year.

  2. Contact Dave at:                                             mtecmodels@frontier.com

  3. Jim Elliot


Santa Clara Station

    Built in 1863 by the San Francisco & San Jose Railroad.

Reference

  1. See the 1953 color photo on page 50 (bottom) of Dill's "Southern Pacific's Scenic Coast Line"

  2. John Sweetser

Paint

  1. Santa Clara Station was the Standard SP yellow with brown trim.


Sylmar Station

  1. The depot built at Sylmar, California in 1916. The structure was 12 feet wide, narrower than most SP depots, and 56 feet long.

Reference

  1. Bruce Petty’s Volume 5 of Southern Pacific Lines Common Standard Plans book contains a drawing of Sylmar station.

Modeling Sylmar Station

  1. The Sylmar depot plans in Petty’s book, in full-size form, is conveniently in HO scale, so it was easy to dimension wall lengths and heights, and measure positions of windows and doors.


Turn of the Century Depots

  1. KCET Public Television link to "Silent Cameos of the lost Southern Pacific Depot" with some additional photos:

  2.                                                  http://silentlocations.wordpress.com/2013/01/15/silent-cameos-of-the-lost-southern-pacific-depot

  3.                                                  http://tinyurl.com/silentfilmatcentralstation

  4. Robert Simpson


Train Order Station

Modeling Train Order Station

AL & W Lines

  1. SP1 - SP Train Order Station is available as a laser kits    alwlines.com



  2. The parts are fine-quality and everything fit to a "T". Unlike the instructions, hand paint all the parts while still attached to part sheets and sprues and to complete the walls before forming the structures.


  3. The wooden parts are made from very thin wood which make them fragile. It was a problem with  the station which had relatively larger wall sections and multiple openings for windows and door. I experienced several breakages along the horizontal scribes while removing the parts from the sheets. I recommend a liberal application of vertical pieces of stripwood in the interior to strengthen the walls. Since the clearances are tight at the corners at the front side of the station, I recommend scale 2x2-inch stripwood placed immediately adjacent to the window openings at those points. Be sure to allow clearance for the floor and avoid interference with the interior wall.


  4. The method of installing the station's chimney by inserting it through already-installed shingles is inadequate. Instead use bits of paper painted to simulate flashing, installed after gluing the chimney and before applying the shingles.

  5. Mark Pierce

Showcase Miniatures

    kit 2006, Black Butte T/O office


Train Order Stand

Reference

  1. Order Station - Planeport, Tx.          Railroad Model Craftsman     Nov. 1981

Modeling Train Order Stand

Scratchbuild

  1. Train Order Stand - SP Type -             Easy to Build Model Railroad Structures’ Book -Kalmbach #12014






 
Southern Pacific Lines
Modeling S.P. Depot Structures
SP Depots
Depot Types
Wooden Combination Station

S.P Standard Structure Paint

Common Standard Depots
Depot Style 1-18
Depot Style 22
Depot Style 23

Specific Depots

Special Stations
 Dunsmuir Station
 Los Angeles Union Terminal
 San Luis Obispo Station
 Santa Barbara Station
 Train Order Station
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